Frequently Asked Questions


 

What’s the difference between a corn and a callus?

Corns are hard skin on the toes. Calluses are located on other areas of the foot or ankle. They are really the same thing, just in different locations. So corns are basically just calluses that are located on the toes. Watch the above video on corns and calluses to help explain the difference in greater detail.

What Kinds of Insurance Does your Office Accept?

Our office accepts a variety of HMOs, PPOs, and other health plans including, but not limited to:

AETNA, AmeriGroup, Blue Cross Blue Shield (Network P and Network S), Cigna, First Health, Great West, HealthSpring, Humana, Mail Handlers Benefit, Medicaid, Medicare, Mutual of Omaha, POMCO, Principal Life Insurance, Secure Horizons, State Farm, TennCare, Travelers, TriCare, United Healthcare, and Windsor Medicare Extra.

*We continue to add to our list of insurances that we accept in our office. Currently, we accept every insurance policy that is available in middle Tennessee.

For a complete listing, please visit our office page.

How fast can I get in for an appointment?

Same day appointments are available for emergencies. For non-emergent cases, patients may have to wait up to a week for an available appointment. If you need to be seen right away, we can usually work you into the schedule – just ask! Contact us at (888) 713-0906 or request an appointment online.

Does your office accept new patients? 

Yes, all of our offices are accepting new patients. Contact us to set up an appointment at (888) 713-0906 or request an appointment online.

Are your doctors board certified?

Yes, we have board certified podiatrists at Neuhaus Foot & Ankle. Dr. Neuhaus is Board Certified in Foot Surgery and Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery. Dr. Knox is Board certified in Foot Surgery, Dr. Hawthorn is Board Certified in Foot Surgery, and Dr. Toy is Board Certified.

What do your doctors treat? 

The podiatrists at Neuhaus Foot and Ankle treat any and all foot and ankle conditions. These include, but aren’t limited to ankle sprains and fractures, arthritis, athlete’s foot, bone spurs, bunions, children’s foot care, corns, calluses, diabetic foot care, diabetic shoes and inserts, flat feet, hammertoes, heel pain, ingrown toenails, joint replacement, neuromas, plantar fasciitis,reconstructive surgery, sports injuries, stress fractures, tendinitis, toenail fungus, warts, and wound care. If you have any questions about your specific problem and whether or not we treat it, feel free to call our office at (888) 713-0906 or contact us online and we will be happy to let you know. 

What is a DPM?

D.P.M. stands for Doctor of Podiatric Medicine. In the video above, Dr. Matthew Neuhaus of Neuhaus Foot and Ankle describes what a podiatrist does in more detail, and advises patients on the difference between a podiatrist and an orthopedic surgeon.

Podiatrist vs. Orthopedic Surgeon – Who do I go to for my foot problem? What’s the difference?

An orthopedic surgeon specializes in the surgery of bones.  A podiatrist is a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine concentrating on the lower extremities.  In the video above, Dr. Neuhaus of Neuhaus Foot and Ankle goes into more detail to help you understand the difference and decide which one you should see about your foot or ankle problem.

Why do you have a nail spa in your Smyrna office?

At Neuhaus Foot & Ankle we want to provide our patients with the best services possible. Over the years, we have had many questions from patients about the relationship between pedicures and manicures and nail fungus. Many of our patients worry about going to nail spas and don’t know what to look for in a good spa.

So, we decided to offer a safe, hygienic nail spa, not just for our patients, but for everyone! Footprints in the Sand is podiatrist-supervised, and at our nail spa you can rest easy knowing your nails are in good hands! Our nail technicians are well-trained and experienced, and they not only know how to give you a safe, hygienic manicure or pedicure, they know how to give you a great spa experience!

For more information, visit our Footprints in the Sand website.

Schedule an appointment by emailing: footprintsnailspa@gmail.com

Can I Use Over-The-Counter Products for Ingrown Toenails?

Ingrown toenails are very common and can become very painful. Every once in a while, I have patients tell me they used a product from the drug store before coming in to see me. Dr Scholl’s does make a product for ingrown nails. What consumers need to understand is that this product has some very mild pain reliever in it, but it will NOT fix an ingrown toenail. An ingrown toenail is caused by a nail digging into the adjacent skin. That causes pain. Removing the offending corner of the nail is really the only way to relieve the pain. Cutting a V in the tip of the nail does NOT work. Soaking in Epsom salts can relieve some swelling but will NOT eliminate the ingrown nail. See your podiatrist if you have recurrent ingrown nails. The treatment is quite simple and is very effective. I call it my 98% procedure because it works so well. Watch the video above to find out more, and remember the next time you are standing at the pharmacy contemplating the purchase of the ingrown toenail “cure”, what you really need to do is call your podiatrist. Better yet, call Neuhaus Foot and Ankle at 615-220-8788 or at our toll-free number 888-713-0906. You can also request an appointment with us online.

Should you see a doctor for a broken or fractured toe?

Yes. Any fracture or possible fracture should be evaluated by a medical professional and treated appropriately, even if it is in your toe. People often believe that nothing can be done for broken toes, but that is not true. It is actually important that fractured toes be treated. Untreated breaks can lead to the development of a deformity, arthritis, or chronic pain. As far as treatment, the toe may need a splint, or in severe cases, surgery. Shoe changes may also be necessary. Watch the video above for more information on toe fractures, and if you believe you have fractured your toe, contact our office for an appointment at (888) 713-0906 or see a podiatrist in your area. 

How should I cut my toenails?

This is a very common question we receive from patients who have toenail problems. You should cut your toenails straight across and make sure not to cut them too short.

Custom Orthotics vs. shoe inserts from the drug store – what’s the difference?

The drug store orthotics will provide your foot with a cushion but not much support, while the custom orthotics your podiatrist prescribes are specially made for your foot and your foot or ankle problem. We have made a video specifically answering this question and explaining the differences in more detail. Please watch our video above to learn why the drug store/big box store orthotics don’t offer what a custom orthotic does.

What causes warts? How do you get rid of warts?

A wart is a growth on the skin that develops when the skin is infected by a virus. A plantar wart is a wart on the bottom of the foot. Plantar warts are caused by direct contact with the human papilloma virus (HPV). This is the same virus that causes warts on other areas of the body. Typically, the plantar wart virus is acquired in public places where people go barefoot, such as locker rooms, swimming pools, and karate classes. There are various topical or oral treatments, laser therapy, cryotherapy or freezing the wart, or surgery to remove the wart.

We’ve provided you with a great video to answer more of your questions regarding plantar warts.

What is Athlete’s foot?

Athlete’s foot is a common skin problem caused by a fungus. The most common sign of Athlete’s foot is when your skin becomes scaly and itchy. Over time it may cause a break in the skin and become sore. The fungus is commonly picked up from shower floors, locker rooms, and exercise facilities. The infection may clear up without treatment, but Athlete’s foot is mostly treated with topical medication. It is best to treat this once you notice the infection before this becomes a severe infection. If left untreated, Athlete’s foot can lead to a serious bacterial infection or spread to your toenail and cause onychomycosis (toenail fungus).

Does the laser treatment hurt? Is laser treatment covered by insurance?

The Q-Clear laser treatment does not hurt. It is a quick and painless procedure for treating toenail fungus. In our office, we have seen no side effects. Unfortunately, at this time, the procedure is not covered by insurance.

Watch the video above to learn more about the basics of laser treatment for toenail fungus.

What is toenail fungus? How do you treat toenail fungus?

Toenail fungus develops when a fungus penetrates the skin and starts growing within the nail. Fungal infections can cause the toenail to appear thick, discolored, or flaky. As the infection progresses, debris may begin to build up and a foul smell may be noticed. The infected nail and toe may become painful.

Nail fungus is extremely common and can be treated by a podiatrist. The treatment used for the fungus will depend on your specific case, but there are several effective treatmet options for nail fungus. Some common treatmets include natural home remedies, over-the-counter topical treatments, prescription medications, and the newest treatment method available: laser treatment. When considering treatment for nai fungus, it is important to compare the benefits and risks of all possible treatment options, and discuss treatments with your podiatrist. For more information, visit our Toenail Fungus Treatments page. 

Can ingrown toenails be permanently fixed?

Yes, our ingrown toenail procedure is over 98% effective and this procedure is done in the office. Don’t suffer through the pain of recurrent ingrown toenails! If you are experiencing this problem, contact a podiatrist. You can also watch the video above to see exactly how the procedure is completed.

Can I wear nail polish after laser treatment for toenail fungus?

Patients often ask in the office if they can wear nail polish on their toenails after having the laser treatment performed for toenail fungus. The answer is yes! You can wear nail polish after undergoing laser treatment for toenail fungus.

If you have more questions about laser treatment, watch the video above or contact our office at (888) 713-0906. In the video, Dr. Neuhaus explains what laser treatment is and tells you more about what you can expect from the treatment.

Should I See a Doctor for Nail Fungus? Is it Possible the Fungus Will Go Away on its Own?

You should see a podiatrist for the treatment of fungal nails. Toenail fungus can be difficult to treat and your podiatrist can offer you the best treatment options available. Nail fungus does not just go away on its own, and it is important to treat a fungus promptly and appropriately. Nail fungus can spread to other areas and other nails, and it is also possible to spread the infection to other people. You are putting the people around you, including family members, at risk of contracting nail fungus as well. Do not leave fungal nails untreated. For your own health and the health of others, see a podiatrist. Never just wait for the nails to clear up on their own.

If you need to set up an appointment with Neuhaus Foot & Ankle request an appointment online or call us at (888) 713-0906.

Do home remedies work in treating nail fungus?

Home remedies are NOT clinically proven to work in treating fungal nails. Toenail fungus is best treated by a podiatrist. There are some over-the-counter anti-fungal creams available that may be successful in treating early nail fungus, but home remedies that you read about on the internet or hear from friends or family should not be trusted. We recommend consulting a podiatrist if you suspect a fungus. Using home remedies that may not work just gives the fungus time to spread, and some home remedies can even be dangerous to your health. You can watch the video above for more information on nail fungus, or you can contact us online or at (888) 713-0906.

How long will it take to see results after nail fungus treatment?

There is no such thing as a quick treatment for toenail fungus. Nail fungus will never just disappear overnight. Treating fungal nails takes a lot of time and patience. The time it takes to begin seeing results really depends on more than one factor. The treatment used for the fungus is important, and some patients just see results faster than others. Some may see results in only a matter of weeks, while others may have to wait for four to six months before results become apparent. If you believe you are suffering from nail fungus, the fastest way to get rid of it is to see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Contact us online for more information or call us at (888) 713-0906.

Can Nail Fungus Be Prevented?

While nail fungus isn’t 100% preventable, there are definitely things you can do to help prevent toenail fungus from developing. Here are a few tips:

  • Keep your feet healthy and hygienic, following the basic foot care guidelines.
  • Don’t walk around with bare feet in public areas, like locker rooms, pools, or exercise studios.
  • Don’t wear tight-fitting footwear or shoes that trap moisture. Try to always wear footwear that allows your feet to breathe.
  • Always wear dry, clean socks. If your feet sweat a lot, change your socks often.
  • Don’t share nail clippers, files, or anything else you use on your feet or nails with others.
  • Even if you don’t share your bathroom supplies, be sure to disinfect them regularly.

For more tips and information on preventing nail fungus, visit our page on preventing fungal nail infections.

Is recurrence of nail fungus common? Should I be worried?

Unfortunately, toenail fungus can be difficult to treat, and there is always a possibility that a fungal infection could come back, which is why it’s important to continue your course of treatment as recommended by your podiatrist even if the fungus appears to be gone, and to follow the preventative care guidelines your podiatrist gives you after treatment to help prevent recurrence. If you do both of those things, it lessens the chances that your nail fungus will return. However, even if you finish treatment and follow the preventative care guidelines, no one can guarantee that the fungus won’t come back.

If you do notice signs of an infection again, see your doctor as soon as possible, but realize that it is not uncommon for nail fungus to recur and, as long as you seek treatment, you shouldn’t be overly worried. Your podiatrist may recommend another form of treatment to get rid of the fungus or just another course of the same treatment. Feel free to contact our office online for an appointment or call us at (888) 713-0906 with any questions. We can help you get rid of your nail fungus!

Do heel spurs really cause my foot pain?

No, typically they do not. Although this is a common misconception, heel spurs rarely cause pain. The pain is often coming from another source, like the plantar fascia.

Please watch our video above about Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Spur Syndrome to learn more about what causes your foot pain.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia, that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone.

Also known as heel spur syndrome, the condition is often successfully treated with conservative measures, such as the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.

Does the cortisone injection hurt?

Yes, sometimes the cortisone injections hurt. Very few shots are painless. However, the pain from a cortisone injection shouldn’t last long and the goal is to relieve pain in the long run.

Watch the video above to learn more about cortisone injections or visit our page Ten Things You Should Know When Getting a Steroid Injection. The video can help you understand more about cortisone injections, their side effects, how they help to treat foot and ankle problems, and more.

Why do my feet hurt when I first wake up in the morning?

A common complaint from our patients is that when they first get out of bed in the morning, their feet are really painful. There are several possible causes of morning foot pain, but the number one cause of this chronic morning foot pain is Plantar Fasciitis.

We’ve provided you with a great video to help you understand the basics of morning foot pain. Watch the video above to learn about possible conditions that may be causing your morning foot pain and get some simple tips to help relieve that foot pain in the morning.

What Causes Foot Spasms?

Spasms can be unsettling and most people wonder after they have had a spasm about what caused it and if it could be a warning sign of a something worse going on. If you want to know why you are having spasms, first it is important to know exactly what a spasm is. A spasm is a contraction that occurs in the hands, fingers, feet or toes. Sometimes spasms can be violent and are seen along with muscle cramps, convulsions and twitching.

A spasm in the feet or toe is called a carpopedal spasm. Carpopedal spasms are usually accompanied by numbness, tingling, or a “pins-and-needles” feeling. Muscle weakness, fatigue, cramping, twitching, and uncontrolled, purposeless, rapid movement are not an uncommon occurrence with carpopedal spasms either. Some common causes of spasms are:

  • Hypocalcemia (calcium deficiency)
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Muscle cramps (Most often caused by sports or occupational muscle injury)

Can I get arthritis in my feet?

Yes! Many people don’t know that it is possible to get arthritis in your feet and ankles, but there are 33 joints in each foot that can be affected by arthritis.

It is important to catch arthritis early and start treatment. Arthritis can be a very painful condition and can even be debilitating when it is in the feet and ankles, affecting your movement and way of life if it progresses too far and inhibits walking.

Some common symptoms of arthritis in the feet are:

  • Early morning stiffness
  • Limitation of motion in a joint
  • Heat or redness
  • Swelling

If you believe you are experiencing symptoms of arthritis, call our office to set up an appointment at (615) 220-8788 or contact us online.

To learn more about arthritis symptoms and treatments, watch the video above or visit our page on arthritis of the foot and ankle. There are surgical procedures that are sometimes used for the treatment of arthritis. Visit our arthritis surgery page for more information.

Should I see a doctor for a puncture wound in the foot?

The short answer is yes. You should see a doctor for a puncture wound in your foot.

A puncture wound (stepping on a nail, for example) needs to be cleaned and checked by a doctor. It is very important to make sure the entirety of the object that penetrated the foot has been removed. A thorn or other foreign object might break off when you remove it and leave a piece inside the wound, which can cause complications with healing and can lead to infection.

Puncture wounds are particularly prone to infection because debris or bacteria on the object that punctures the foot can be pushed up far into the wound. If something went through your shoe or sock, you can even have pieces of shoe or sock material inside of the wound.

A podiatrist can properly clean and care for the wound and advise you on further treatment. Watch the above video to hear Dr. Kumar, a podiatrist in our Hermitage location, talk about puncture wounds.

If you have suffered a puncture wound to your foot, contact us for an appointment at (615)220-8788 or use our appointment request form. 

What can I do if I have high arches?

There is nothing wrong with having high arches. Each foot is different and has a different shape and structure. If you do have high arches, here are 5 tips to consider to obtain ultimate comfort.

  • Choose a cushioned shoe with a softer midsole and more flexibility.
  • Never go barefoot, even at home.
    • Try finding a house shoe that you can slide an insert into or that has an arch that fits your foot.
  • Find a shoe insert that distributes the pressure evenly across the entire bottom of your foot. It should relieve the pain at the ball of your foot and heel.
  • Stretch daily in order to prevent tendons and muscles from getting stiff and tight.
  • If conservative options have failed, you may need an X-ray to evaluate whether surgical intervention is necessary.

If you believe you need to be seen regarding a high arch, please feel free to give our office a call to get an appointment scheduled.

Feel free to watch the video below on different stretching techniques for your feet.

How do you fix a bunion?

Surgery is the only way to correct a bunion. There are pads/cushions available to help with the discomfort and pain caused by a bunion, but this will not fix the deformity itself. If you would like more information on getting rid of the bunion through surgery, we’ve provided you with a great video to help you understand the basics for bunion surgery. Watch the video with the link above.

For more information, you can contact us at 615-220-8788 or at our toll-free number 888-713-0906. If you are suffering from a bunion and would like to set up an appointment with the Neuhaus Foot and Ankle office, you can also request an appointment online.

What Should I Know About Bunions?

A bunion is a large bump on the side of your foot, which is actually just a visual sign of the change in the framework of your foot. With a bunion, your big toe is deviated and forced inward toward your second toe. That actually changes the alignment of the bones in your foot and makes that noticeable bump on the side of your foot that we call a bunion.

There are a few things that people usually don’t know about bunions. Here are five of them:

  1. Bunions aren’t always painful and if you do feel pain from a bunion, it is usually not until the last stages of the disorder. However, if you wear inappropriate shoes, you will feel symptoms earlier or make the symptoms worse.
  2. Oftentimes, bunions are inherited. Actually, we don’t actually inherit the bunion, but we inherit our foot shape. Foot shape plays a big part in the development of bunions. So if you have bunions, your parents or siblings may suffer from them as well.
  3. Women are more likely to suffer from bunion symptoms than men. This is because women’s shoes, such as high heels, generally have tighter toe boxes, which cramp the toes and cause bunion pain.
  4. Surgery is actually a great option for bunions. Recent advances have made it possible to operate on bunions with a very high success rate. However, there are many other conservative treatment options available before surgery.
  5. Bunions are a progressive disorder. This means that bunions will get worse as time progresses and become bigger and more noticeable.

Are bunions inherited?

No, bunions themselves are not inherited. However, the shape and type of your foot is inherited, and the mechanical structure of your foot can lead to the development of a bunion. Since the structure of your foot can lead to the development of a bunion, you may see bunions in more than one family member because of similar foot shapes and structure. This leads many people to think the actual bunions are inherited, but that is not the case. You can still develop a bunion even if no one else in your family has one. If you notice a bunion developing, see a podiatrist for an evaluation. You can contact the Neuhaus Foot & Ankle office online to request an appointment or call us at (615)220-8788.

Why do I have a bump on the side of my toe?

If you have a big bump on the side of your big toe that looks like this:

You may have a bunion and you should see a podiatrist for evaluation and treatment. You can treat some of the pain caused by a bunion at home by wearing appropriate footwear, using orthotic devices or foot pads in your shoes, performing foot exercises, and more.

But, a bunion is a bone deformity, and there is nothing you can do to fix that without the help of a podiatrist. Depending on the severity of the bunion and the needs of the patient, bunion surgery, or a bunionectomy, may be necessary. For more information, visit our page on bunions or our page on bunion surgery, or contact us online or at (888) 713-0906. You can also watch the video above How Do I Get a Bunion?

Is it possible for a bunion to go away on its own?

No. A bunion will not just go away on its own. In fact, a bunion will only get progressively worse as time goes on if not treated. If you have a bunion, you should see a podiatrist for an evaluation. Your podiatrist will determine the best treatment options for your particular case. The treatment will depend on the severity of the bunion. The treatments available range from conservative options, like padding, orthotic devices, splints, and/or exercises, to more invasive treatment options, like bunion surgery. The conservative treatment options can help to relieve pain and stop bunion progress, but they will not make the deformity or “bump” go away. The only way to get rid of that bony bump is with a surgical procedure. For more information on bunions, you can watch the video above or you can contact us online or at (888) 713-0906.

Why are women more likely to develop bunion symptoms than men?

Women are more likely to develop bunion symptoms than men mostly because of the footwear many women choose to wear. Women tend to wear narrow shoes that crowd the toes and put a lot of pressure on the feet, like high heels. This is not to say that the shoes alone cause the bunions to develop. There are usually underlying causes, such as an inherited foot shape. The types of shoes a person chooses to wear can make the problem worse, though, and can cause a bunion to progress faster, leading to the development of bunion symptoms. Watch our video above for more information on bunions.

What is a bunionectomy?

A bunionectomy is the surgical removal of a bunion. There are several different types of bunionectomies, and the procedure that is chosen for your particular case will depend on what structural changes have occurred in the foot due to the bunion development. 

If you’re considering bunion surgery, watch our video below “Bunion Surgery: What To Expect”, and visit our page on bunion surgery for more information.

What are possible treatments for a bunion?

The first step in treating a bunion is relieving the patient of pain and taking the pressure off the bunion. The second step is halting the progressment of the bunion.

The following treatment options may be used in treating a bunion:

  • Padding. Padding can help to relieve pain, especially pain due to footwear.
  • Corn or callus removal. If corns or calluses, or other foot problems, have devloped due to the bunion, they will need to be treated as well.
  • Footwear changes.
  • Orthotics. Inserts custom-made by a podiatrist or over-the-counter inserts may be necessary.
  • Exercises.
  • Night splint.
  • Bunion surgery

For more information on bunions and bunion treatments, visit our page on bunions. If you need our help treating a bunion, call us at (888) 713-0906 or request an appointment online.

Can I see my general practitioner for nail fungus?

If you suspect nail fungus, it is best to see a podiatrist. Podiatrists have spent many years training to spot, evaluate, and treat problems in the ankles, feet, toes, and nails, and podiatrists treat fungal nails regularly. Your podiatrist will have much more experience in treating fungal nails than your general practitioner.

Your general practitioner may be able to treat your nail fungus, but most general practitioners do not have access to some of the treatments that podiatrists use, like laser treatment for nail fungus, and some general practitioners will just refer you to a podiatrist or possibly a dermatologist anyway.

Watch our videos on nail fungus above for more information on fungal nails and treatments.
If you suspect nail fungus, feel free to contact our office online for an appointment or give us a call at (888) 713-0906.

Can I catch nail fungus when getting a pedicure?

Yes. If instruments are not sanitized properly, it is possible for nail fungus to spread during a pedicure. That’s why if you decide to get a manicure or pedicure, it is important to choose the salon or spa carefully. Check out your nail technician beforehand and look into his or her training and experience, and do not be afraid to ask questions about the way instruments and the pedicure/manicure area are sanitized. For this very reason, we opened our nail spa, Footprints in the Sand, to provide Middle Tennessee with a safe, podiatrist-supervised nail spa.

To schedule an appointment with our nail salon, you can send an email to: footprintsnailspa@gmail.com

What are the hours in your different offices?

Neuhaus Foot & Ankle currently has six different office locations: Bellevue, Brentwood, Hermitage, Lebanon, Mt. Juliet, Smyrna, and Waverly. We have offices across Middle Tennessee for the convenience of our patients, and we offer varying hours at our different locations.

For a complete list of hours, contact information for each location, and maps and directions, visit our About Us page.

Also, if you are considering making an appointment in one of our offices, feel free to give us a call at (615)22-8788 for more information, or contact us online. Remember, you can request an appointment online as well!

Can I get arthritis in my feet?

Yes! Many people don’t know that it is possible to get arthritis in your feet and ankles, but there are 33 joints in each foot that can be affected by arthritis.

It is important to catch arthritis early and start treatment. Arthritis can be a very painful condition and can even be debilitating when it is in the feet and ankles, affecting your movement and way of life if it progresses too far and inhibits walking.

Some common symptoms of arthritis in the feet are:

  • Early morning stiffness
  • Limitation of motion in a joint
  • Heat or redness
  • Swelling

If you believe you are experiencing symptoms of arthritis, call our office to set up an appointment at (615) 220-8788 or contact us online.

To learn more about arthritis symptoms and treatments, watch the video above or visit our page on arthritis of the foot and ankle. There are surgical procedures that are sometimes used for treatment of arthritis. Visit our arthritis surgery page for more information.

What can I do if I have high arches?

There is nothing wrong with having high arches. Each foot is different and has a different shape and structure. If you do have high arches, here are 5 tips to consider to obtain ultimate comfort.

Choose a cushioned shoe with a softer midsole and more flexibility.
Never go barefoot, even at home.
Try finding a house shoe that you can slide an insert into or that has an arch that fits your foot.
Find a shoe insert that distributes the pressure evenly across the entire bottom of your foot. It should relieve the pain at the ball of your foot and heel.
Stretch daily in order to prevent tendons and muscles from getting stiff and tight.
If conservative options have failed, you may need an X-ray to evaluate whether surgical intervention is necessary.

If you believe you need to be seen regarding a high arch, please feel free to give our office a call to get an appointment scheduled at (615)220-8788.

Feel free to watch the video above on different stretching techniques for your feet.

Should I see a doctor for a puncture wound in the foot?

The short answer is yes. You should see a doctor for a puncture wound in your foot.

A puncture wound (stepping on a nail, for example) needs to be cleaned and checked by a doctor. It is very important to make sure the entirety of the object that penetrated the foot has been removed. A thorn or other foreign object might break off when you remove it and leave a piece inside the wound, which can cause complications with healing and can lead to infection.

Puncture wounds are particularly prone to infection because debris or bacteria on the object that punctures the foot can be pushed up far into the wound. If something went through your shoe or sock, you can even have pieces of shoe or sock material inside of the wound.

A podiatrist can properly clean and care for the wound and advise you on further treatment. Watch the above video to hear Dr. Kumar, a podiatrist in our Hermitage location, talk about puncture wounds.

If you have suffered a puncture wound to your foot, contact us for an appointment at (888) 713-0906 or use our appointment request form. 

Do I need an appointment for Footprints in the Sand nail spa?

Yes, you do need an appointment for the nail spa. You can always call the day of and see if there are openings. Since the nail spa provides one on one attention to each customer, there is not a walk-in opportunity. You can set up an appointment by calling (615)220-8789 or by emailing footprintsnailspa@gmail.com.

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