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Toll-Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
Phone: (615) 220-8788
TollFree: 1 (888) 713-0906
  • Smyrna Office
  • Stonecrest Physicians Building
    300 Stonecrest Blvd, Ste 450

    Smyrna, TN 37167
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Toll Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
  • Directions
  • Brentwood Office
  • 10644 Concord Road
    Brentwood, TN 37027
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Toll Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
  • Directions
  • Hermitage Office
  • Summit Outpatient Center
    3901 Central Pike, Ste 353

    Hermitage, TN 37076
  • Phone: (615)220-8788
  • Fax: (615) 889-2370
  • Directions
  • Lebanon Office
  • 1424 Baddour Pkwy, Ste E
    Lebanon, TN 37087
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Fax: (615) 889-2370
  • Directions
  • Bellevue Office
  • 140 Belle Forest Circle
    Nashville, TN 37221
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Directions
  • Mt. Juliet Office
  • 660 S. Mt. Juliet Road, Suite 120
    Mt. Juliet, TN 37122
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Directions
  • Waverly Office
  • 110 Hillwood Drive
    Waverly, TN 37185
  • Phone: 615-220-8788
  • Directions

Why You Might Need Neuroma Surgery

Neuroma surgery involves the removal of the abnormal nerve segments that runs between two adjacent metatarsal (forefoot) bones and their respective toes.  Thus, there will be some numbness of the adjacent toes after the surgery that may be permanent. 

Goals

  • Reduce or eliminate pain associated with the neuroma.

Possible Alternatives to Surgery

  • Orthotics or padded insoles, with/without metatarsal pad
  • Wider shoes, low heels, or orthopedic shoes.
  • Medications – oral or injected
  • Physical Therapy – Ice Massages

Potential Complications / Risks

Recurrent neuroma (amputation neuroma); Recurrent pain; Numbness; Stiffness; Prolonged post-operative swelling; Prolonged post-operative pain; Incomplete relief of pain; Delayed healing or non-healing of skin / soft tissue; Unsightly or painful scar; Circulation disturbance of skin / soft tissue; Infection of soft tissue or bone; Tendon injury or tendonitis; Toe deformity; Weakness of the toe; Poor toe to ground contact; Thinned fat pad on bottom of foot; Change in shoe size; Hematoma or bleeding complication; Phlebitis; Mild to life threatening reaction to medications and/or anesthesia. 

Usual Post-Operative Care / Recovery

Walk in a special surgical shoe immediately after surgery with crutches or other assistive device; Use elevation, rest, water-tight ice packs, and prescribed medications for pain and swelling control; keep bandages dry and in place for approximately two weeks; sutures are removed in approximately two weeks; utilize anti-swelling and anti-stiffness physical therapy for one to six months; return to loose shoes or sneakers in approximately two to six weeks; return to fashionable shoes in one to four months; return to sedentary activities in two weeks to four months; possible use of orthoses long-term.