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Toll-Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
Phone: (615) 220-8788
TollFree: 1 (888) 713-0906
  • Smyrna Office
  • Stonecrest Physicians Building
    300 Stonecrest Blvd, Ste 450

    Smyrna, TN 37167
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Toll Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
  • Directions
  • Brentwood Office
  • 10644 Concord Road
    Brentwood, TN 37027
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Toll Free: 1 (888) 713-0906
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  • Hermitage Office
  • Summit Outpatient Center
    3901 Central Pike, Ste 353

    Hermitage, TN 37076
  • Phone: (615)220-8788
  • Fax: (615) 889-2370
  • Directions
  • Lebanon Office
  • 1424 Baddour Pkwy, Ste E
    Lebanon, TN 37087
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Fax: (615) 889-2370
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  • Bellevue Office
  • 140 Belle Forest Circle
    Nashville, TN 37221
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
  • Directions
  • Mt. Juliet Office
  • 660 S. Mt. Juliet Road, Suite 120
    Mt. Juliet, TN 37122
  • Phone: (615) 220-8788
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  • Waverly Office
  • 110 Hillwood Drive
    Waverly, TN 37185
  • Phone: 615-220-8788
  • Directions

Information on Acrocyanosis


Acrocyanosis is a disorder which affects the arteries that provide blood to the skin of the hands and feet. In people who suffer from this disorder, spasms in the arteries cause a blockage and the blood cannot get through. While the disorder is not painful, the arteries involved carry oxygen and nutrients through the blood to the skin of the extremities and there are consequences when those arteries are blocked. With an inadequate blood supply, the skin doesn't have enough oxygen, which causes the skin to change color. The skin will appear to be a dark blue to purple color. The characteristic dark blue to purple color is called cyanosis.

Acrocyanosis is usually a benign disorder, but can indicate the presence of another serious disorder or disease, such as cardiovascular or connective tissue disease. This disorder happens more often in women than men. Symptoms of Acrocyanosis include persistently cold feet, blue skin discoloration, sweaty or moist skin, and swelling.

Treatment for the disorder aims at keeping your foot warm and the blood circulating correctly. Treatment could include wearing insulated boots, thin polypropylene liner socks, which will help to draw moisture away from the skin, and/or use of an insulated sock to maintain normal skin temperature. The disorder itself cannot be remedied, but it is not progressive, so it does not get worse over time.